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date: 20 November 2017

Summary and Keywords

Although Americans have adopted and continue to adopt children from all over the world, Asian minors have immigrated and joined American families in the greatest numbers and most shaped our collective understanding of the process and experiences of adoption. The movement and integration of infants and youths from Japan, the Philippines, India, Vietnam, Korea, and China (the most common sending nations in the region) since the 1940s have not only altered the composition and conception of the American family but also reflected and reinforced the complexities of U.S. relations with and actions in Asia. In tracing the history of Asian international adoption, we can undercover shifting ideas of race and national belonging. The subject enriches the fields of Asian American and immigration history.

Keywords: Asian international adoption, refugee, transracial, transnational, International Social Service, Amerasian, Cold War, humanitarian, Pearl S. Buck, redemption, Operation Babylift, heritage tours, Hong Kong Project, Harry and Bertha Holt, Syngman Rhee

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